Porcelain and murano glass -

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Porcelain slowly evolved in China and was finally achieved at some point about 2,000 and 1,200 years ago, then slowly spread to other East Asian countries, and finally Europe and the rest of the world. The European name, porcelain in English, come from the old Italian porcellana (cowrie shell) because of its resemblance to the translucent surface of the shell.
Capodimonte porcelain is porcelain created by the Capodimonte porcelain manufactory, which was established in Naples, Italy, in 1743. Capodimonte porcelain was made in direct emulation of Meissen porcelain. Capodimonte is famous for its moulded figurines and its decorative modelled flowers applied to cups and vases.
The origins of murano and glassmaking in Venice go back to the times of the Roman Empire when molded glass was used for illumination in bathhouses. Blending Roman experience with the skills learned from the Byzantine Empire and trade with the Orient, Venice emerged as a prominent glass-manufacturing center as early as the 8th century. One of the earliest furnaces for glass on a Venetian island, dating from the 8th century, was discovered by archaeologists in 1960.
Our current offer consists of few Capodimonte porcelain vases and lamps as well as a large and impressive collection of murano glass decorations.